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UIA Gets Most Votes But Fails To Capture Majority

 
2/13/2005: Iraq's election results have been announced, but Iraq's future remains unclear. It appears that Iraqis have voted overwhelmingly to throw out the US-installed Ayad Allawi and a near majority have voted for the United Iraqi Alliance (UIA). The second plank in the UIA platform called for "a timetable for the withdrawal of the multinational forces from Iraq", but as with the UIA's other pledges to expand the public sector, keep the oil and drop the debt, this promise is unlikely to be kept if the US has its way and Iraq's current finance minister Adel Abd al-Mahdi is chosen by the UIA to lead Iraq.

2/13/2005: Iraq's election results have been announced, but Iraq's future remains unclear. It appears that Iraqis have voted overwhelmingly to throw out the US-installed Ayad Allawi and a near majority have voted for the United Iraqi Alliance (UIA). The second plank in the UIA platform called for "a timetable for the withdrawal of the multinational forces from Iraq", but as with the UIA's other pledges to expand the public sector, keep the oil and drop the debt, this promise is unlikely to be kept if the US has its way and Iraq's current finance minister Adel Abd al-Mahdi is chosen by the UIA to lead Iraq.

Election results were as follows:
The United Iraqi Alliance won more than 4 million votes, or about 48 percent of the total cast. 228 candidates, drawn largely from the Shiite political establishment and tacitly endorsed by Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani. It includes Abdel-Aziz al-Hakim, cleric who heads Iraq's largest political group, the Shiite Supreme Council for the Islamic Revolution in Iraq.
The Kurdish Alliance List received 2.175 million votes, or 26 percent. Among the Kurdish Alliance List's 165 candidates's were the Kurdistan Democratic Party leader Massoud Barzani and the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan leader Jalal Talabani.
The Iraqi List was third in candidate lists, winning about 1.168 million votes, or 13.8 percent of the total. The Iraqi List was lead by interim Prime Minister Ayad Allawi and Included a mix of Shiites and Sunnis (but Shiites account for the majority of top names).
The Iraqis Party won about 150,000 votes, or less than 2 percent. The Iraqi Party was led by interim President Ghazi al-Yawer and favored by some Sunnis who agreed with al-Yawer's opposition to U.S. attacks aimed at wiping out insurgents in the hotbed cities of Fallujah and Mosul.
The Assembly Of Independent Democrats took only 12,000 votes, or 0.1 percent. It ran 78 candidates and was led by the Sunni leader Adnan Pachachi. The Assembly Of Independent Democrats had been expected to fare well among intellectuals and the urban middle class.

"Only 2 per cent of eligible Iraqis in the Sunni Arab-dominated Anbar province voted in Iraq's elections, and only 29 per cent in the mainly Sunni Salahadin province, the final tally released on Sunday showed. In Nineveh province, which has many Sunni Arabs as well as Kurds, turnout was 17 per cent. The figures showed that only 3,803 people voted in the whole of Anbar province. The low turnout in Sunni provinces showed that many Sunni Arabs boycotted the election or stayed away out of fear, which could worsen sectarian tension in Iraq and fuel the insurgency which is mainly waged by Sunni Arab guerrillas. If Sunnis are shut out of Iraq's next government, they could potentially veto a new constitution due to be drawn up this year, causing political deadlock."

In Kirkuk, The Kirkuk Brotherhood list of the two main Kurdish parties(the PUK and the KDP) -- won 58.4 percent of votes, or 237,303 out of 405,951 ballots cast. The Kurds want Kirkuk to be added to the three autonomous provinces of Iraqi Kurdistan.

Sorry George, but Iraq has given you the purple finger | Shiites, Kurds, win Big: Bush Loses Election in Iraq

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